History of Education Review

Articles

Vol. 38, No. 1, January

Urged for More Than Fifty Years: Veterinary Education in New Zealand, C1900-1964
After the 1907 collapse of the new Otago University Veterinary School, a gap of over half a century elapsed before the Massey University Veterinary Faculty was opened in 1964. This interval means linear professionalisation accounts from pre-modern...
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Her Civilising Mission: Discovering Hannah King through Her Textiles
"A first female teacher in the New Zealand Mission" (1) Hannah King (2) occupies a unique place in missionary and colonial history, the history of education, cross-cultural relations and material culture in New Zealand. She was the only woman from...
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When the English Began to Hate: The Manufacture of German Demonisation in British School History Textbooks 1900-1930
Introduction There are a significant number of studies that argue that since the rise of mass education school textbooks have become essential instructional tools for curriculum delivery and that the school textbook holds a unique and significant...
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Countrymindedness and the Democratic Intellect: Permutations and Combinations in a Victorian Country State School, 1853 to 2007
'Countrymindedness' is a resonant but perhaps manufactured term, given wide currency in a 1985 article by political scientist and historian Don Aitkin in the Annual, Australian Cultural History. (1) Political ideology was his focus, as he charted the...
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Learning in Nowhere: Individualism in Correspondence Education in 1938 and 1950
[In correspondence education] there is no class work in the ordinary sense. Each pupil's course is his own. The subjects that comprise it can be chosen to suit the individual pupil alone. The emphasis can be laid where it is most needed. The pupil...
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More Than the Ordinary Domestic Drudge: Women and Technical Education in Auckland 1895-1922
Introduction Like many of his generation George George, the director of Auckland's Seddon Memorial Technical College (2) (1902-22), considered marriage and motherhood as women's true vocation and believed in separate but equal education for girls...
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The Politics of Activity: Emergence and Development of Educational Programs for People with Disabilities between 1750 and 1860
From that moment on, a multitude of these individuals, who in the middle of all us seem to be death when compared to us, regain movement, action and life like we ourselves. Abbe C.M. de l'Epee, 1776 (1) Politics, activity and the history of disability...
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Vol. 37, No. 2, July

Editorial
He Korero mo te Reka o te Kumera (Let the Voices Speak) was the theme of the Australian and New Zealand History of Education Society (ANZHES) conference held in Napier, New Zealand in December 2007. The following articles were selected from papers...
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Timeless Projects: Remembering and Voice in the History of Education
Introduction Developments in approach to oral history have transformed scholarship in the History of Education and have sharpened focus on the relationship between past and present. Over the past four decades there has been a substantial broadening...
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Lucy Spence Morice: 'Mother of Kindergartens' in South Australia
Existing histories of the free kindergarten movement in South Australia (1) scantily acknowledge the key role of Lucy Spence Morice in helping to found the Kindergarten Union (KUSA) in 1905 and subsequently guiding the organisation through financially...
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Voices from Technical Education: Shepparton South Technical School, Victoria, Australia
At Shepparton in the Murray electorate of Victoria in 2007, the Federal Liberal Member, Sharman Stone, announced that under a returned Coalition Government, Shepparton 'would get a stand-alone technical college'. (1) One year earlier, the Victorian...
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Glorified Housekeepers or Pioneering Professionals? the Professional Lives of Home Science Graduates from the University of New Zealand
Contemporary scholarship has enabled a deeper analysis of the dynamics that gave rise to professional home science and a greater understanding of the obstacles women encountered and the strategies they employed to gain legitimacy as the field developed...
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The Means of Creative Expression: Design Education for Town and Country New South Wales in the 1940s
In 1939, an English artist, designer and teacher named Ann Gillmore Rees arrived in New South Wales. Over the next nine years Rees taught design and craft to adults in Sydney, working for the Children's Library and Craft Movement (later to become the...
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Puberty Blues and the Representation of an Australian Comprehensive High School
An examination of cinematic representations of Australian education over time forms one of author's ongoing projects. This line of research overall is based on a number of foundational questions, the most basic of which is: what can the study of film...
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Imag-Ining Ourselves: Illustration and Identity in the New Zealand School Journal
Interest in the role of the New Zealand School Journal as an officially sanctioned publication for schools, has resulted in a number of past studies exploring its relationship to official curriculum, educational policy and wider socio-political developments,...
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Vol. 37, No. 1, January

Editorial
History of Education Review is the official journal of the Australia and New Zealand History of Education Society [ANZHES]. At its Annual General Meeting in December 2007, the ANZHES appointed the editorial team for a further term of five years. We...
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Images and Icons: Female Teachers' Representations of Self and Self-Control in 1920s Ireland
Introduction This article addresses a particular episode that occurred in one of the main female training colleges in Ireland in the late 1920s when students (1) founded the Mary Immaculate Modest Dress and Deportment Crusade (MDDC). Regarded by...
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Khaki in the Classroom: Compulsory Junior Cadet Training in Australian Schools, 1911-31
The passing of the Defence Act (1909), with its provisions for universal military training, was a profound development for Australia. With bi-partisan support the government exacted compulsory peacetime conscription for all 12-25 year old males in...
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The March to Nation: Citizenship, Education, and the Australian Way of Life in New South Wales, Australia, 1940s-1960s
In March 2005, a half-page article appeared in the Australian newspaper the Sydney Morning Herald, highlighting the expanded use of the term 'un-Australian'. (1) The photograph of four school children proudly hoisting the Australian flag that accompanied...
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Lest We Forget: The Kapooka Tragedy 1945
They shall not grow old as we grow old; Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them. [Lest we forget] --from Laurence Binyon (1869-1943), 'For the Fallen', The winnowing fan;...
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Comprehensive Post-Primary Schooling in New Zealand: 1935-1975
Introduction In light of contemporary critiques of New Zealand comprehensive schooling published mainly in the popular press, it is timely to re-examine the origins of and the rationale for the widespread adoption of this model of education. The...
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Vol. 36, No. 2, July

The Middle Class and the Government High School: Private Interests and Public Institutions in Australian Education in the Late Twentieth Century, with Reference to the Case of Sydney (1)
After the Depression and World War II there was considerable pressure in Australia, as in other democracies, not only to improve the lot of citizens through economic and social reform, but to improve the relationship between the state and its citizens....
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The Focus Wasn't on 'Boomsa-Daisy': Sex Education at Shepparton South Technical School, Victoria, 1973-1986
School sex education has the potential to evoke a range of personal and political reactions. While it is usually agreed that sexuality should be 'done' in school, few agree on the best way of 'doing' it. This article provides a personal account of...
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Sowing Seeds for Development: Cyril Jackson's Attempts to Establish Relevant Schooling in a Rural Setting in Western Australia, 1896-1903
Introduction Cyril Jackson (later Sir) became Inspector-General of Schools for Western Australia in late 1896. By the time he left to take up the position of Chief Inspector of Elementary Schools in England and Wales in 1903, Jackson had reorganised...
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The Politics of Pedagogy: Civics Education and Epistemology at Victorian Primary Schools, 1930s and 1950s
Introduction It is both surprising and worrying that as recently as 1999 Denise Meredyth and Julian Thomas could comment in the History of Education Review that 'there has been only preliminary investigation of the emergence, rise and decline of...
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From Idealism to Realism: The Workers' Educational Association of Victoria 1920-1941
On 21 March 1941 the Council of the Workers' Educational Association of Victoria (WEAV), voted itself out of existence. This article discusses how a shift in a philosophical paradigm that took place in the 1920s and 1930s in Australia created one of...
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Vol. 36, No. 1, January

Student Activists at Sydney University 1960-1967: A Problem of Interpretation
The student revolt of 1967 to 1974, which finally expired about 1978, retains its fascination and much of its significance in the twenty-first century. But the seven or so years which preceded it are often passed over as simply a precursor, the incubation...
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'Solving an Empire Problem': The Salvation Army and British Juvenile Migration to Australia
The history of British juvenile migration dates from 1618 when the first group was sent to Richmond, Virginia. Thereafter, juveniles were sent to other parts of the world including North America, Rhodesia (Zimbabwe), South Africa, New Zealand and Australia....
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Tracing the Origin of Rudolf Steiner's Pedagogy of Imagination
Introduction Rudolf Steiner believed that imaginative teaching is a way of creating synthesis and wholeness of human experience. (1) Similarly to John Dewey's with his notion of aesthetic experience, (2) Steiner saw the imagination as a point of...
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Mechanical Contrivances and Fancy Needlework: The Brisbane Exhibition and Education in Colonial Queensland
Since its inception in 1876, Queensland's premier agricultural and pastoral show and largest annual event, the Brisbane Exhibition, has provided a forum in which to observe and reflect on the achievements, values, development and scope of Queensland's...
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The Spinster Teacher in Australia from the 1870s to the 1960s (1)
The never-married single woman or 'spinster' has long been a contentious figure. The word 'spinster' originated as a professional appellation for female spinner but by the eighteenth century it had become the legal term for an unmarried woman, in the...
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Vol. 35, No. 2, July

Heil Mary: Magdalen Asylums and Moral Regulation in Ireland
The Sisters of the Congregation of Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd always have the specific vocation to form a family which can welcome persons in difficulty or who desire to live, an upright and beautiful life after sinning, by offering them...
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Picturing the History of Teacher Education: Photographs and Methodology
Pictures are routinely identified as possible sources for researching history yet they are widely either neglected or underused. This article explores the use of pictorial materials, in particular photographs, in historical analysis. It describes some...
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The Progressive Credentials of Patrick Henry Pearse: A Response to David Limond (1)
Introduction David Limond's article that appeared in History of Education Review in 2005, raises again, a number of pertinent and controversial questions about the educational thought and work of the Irish nationalist Patrick Pearse. The article...
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Rewriting the Responsible Parent
Introduction In On Liberty, first published in 1859, John Stuart Mill argued that parents should be free to raise their children provided they recognised and accepted their moral obligation to educate them. For those who either failed or refused...
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The Voices of the Junior Teachers 1931-1945: Exploitation or Experience in South Australian Schools?
On 13 September 1943, The News, Adelaide's daily afternoon newspaper, carried an account of a serious accusation made that day against the South Australian Education Department. Under the headline 'Junior Teachers job "too big"' it reported that: ...
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Vol. 35, No. 1, January

The Presence of the Past: Melbourne High School in Its Centenary Year
A school's centenary year, particularly if the school has had as rich and controversial a life as Melbourne High School, brings to mind William Faulkner's comment: 'The past is never dead. It's not even past'. (1) I would like to confront you with...
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Imagining the Secondary School: The 'Pictorial Turn' and Representations of Secondary Schools in Two Australian Feature Films of the 1970s
Abstract Derrick Armstrong (2003) recently wrote that: 'History lives through the forms of its representations.' (1) Increasingly the most common representation of historical knowledge is derived from the visual media. This trend has been called...
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Problem or Solution? A Secondary Teacher Training Initiative for a New Era
Introduction Division D, a two-year course of concurrent university study and post-primary teacher preparation, was introduced in New Zealand in 1962. It was one of several initiatives aimed at addressing a staffing crisis in secondary schools that...
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Notions of Civilisation and the Project to 'Civilise' Aborigines in South Australia in the 1840s
Throughout the 1840s the dispossession of the Indigenous people of South Australia through colonisation was accompanied by the implementation of a 'civilising' project aimed at achieving their incorporation into colonial society. Attempts made in the...
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The Aboriginal School at Purfleet, 1903-1965: A Case Study of the Segregation of Aboriginal Children in New South Wales, Australia (1)
Introduction By 1901 in New South Wales, the blueprint for the relationship between Aborigines and Europeans had been established: Aborigines were 'in a far better condition when living in small communities comparatively isolated and removed from...
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Letting in the Light: The Emergence of an Information-Based Civil Society in Post-Dictatorship Argentina, 1984-2004
In 1983, democratic elections ended a seven-year military dictatorship in Argentina, bringing the end of a regime calling itself the 'Process of National Reorganisation,' and with it, the end of the Dirty War, the state's campaign to eliminate what...
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