One Law with Two Outcomes: Comparing the Implementation of CIPA in Public Libraries and Schools

By Jaeger, Paul T.; Yan, Zheng | Information Technology and Libraries, March 2009 | Go to article overview

One Law with Two Outcomes: Comparing the Implementation of CIPA in Public Libraries and Schools


Jaeger, Paul T., Yan, Zheng, Information Technology and Libraries


Though the Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) established requirements for both public libraries and public schools to adopt filters on all of their computers when they receive certain federal funding, it has not attracted a great amount of research into the effects on libraries and schools and the users of these social institutions. This paper explores the implications of CIPA in terms of its effects on public libraries and public schools, individually and in tandem. Drawing from both library and education research, the paper examines the legal background and basis of CIPA, the current state of Internet access and levels of filtering in public libraries and public schools, the perceived value of CIPA, the perceived consequences of CIPA, the differences in levels of implementation of CIPA in public libraries and public schools, and the reasons for those dramatic differences. After an analysis of these issues within the greater policy context, the paper suggests research questions to help provide more data about the challenges and questions revealed in this analysis.

**********

The Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) established requirements for both public libraries and public schools to---as a condition for receiving certain federal funds--adopt filters on all of their computers to protect children from online content that was deemed potentially harmful. (1) Passed in 2000, CIPA was initially implemented by public schools after its passage, but it was not widely implemented in public libraries until the 2003 Supreme Court decision (United States v. American Library Association) upholding the law's constitutionality. (2) Now that CIPA has been extensively implemented for five years in libraries and eight years in schools, it has had time to have significant effects on access to online information and services. While the goal of filtering requirements is to protect children from potentially inappropriate content, filtering also creates major educational and social implications because filters also limit access to other kinds of information and create different perceptions about schools and libraries as social institutions.

Curiously, CIPA and its requirements have not attracted a great amount of research into the effects on schools, libraries, and the users of these social institutions. Much of the literature about CIPA has focused on practical issues---either recommendations on implementing filters or stories of practical experiences with filtering. While those types of writing are valuable to practitioners who must deal with the consequences of filtering, there are major educational and societal issues raised by filtering that merit much greater exploration. While relatively small bodies of research have been generated about CIPA's effects in public libraries and public schools, (3) thus far these two strands of research have remained separate. But it is the contention of this paper that these two strands of research, when viewed together, have much more value for creating a broader understanding of the educational and societal implications. It would be impossible to see the real consequences of CIPA without the development of an integrative picture of its effects on both public schools and public libraries.

In this paper, the implications of CIPA will be explored in terms of effects on public libraries and public schools, individually and in tandem. Public libraries and public schools are generally considered separate but related public sphere entities because both serve core educational and information-provision functions in society. Furthermore, the fact that public schools also contain school library media centers highlights some very interesting points of intersection between public libraries and school libraries in terms of the consequences of CIPA: While CIPA requires filtering of computers throughout public libraries and public schools, the presence of school library media centers makes the connection between libraries and schools stronger, as do the teaching roles of public libraries (e. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, https://quesstia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

One Law with Two Outcomes: Comparing the Implementation of CIPA in Public Libraries and Schools
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, https://quesstia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.